Author: Tony Joett

(10)   Articles
Joett is a vocal coach, singer & songwriter whose

Top Rated Articles

Wedding Invitations Don'ts

By Sarrah Beaumont | 5 Rating | Published 2009-07-21 18:24:23

Much is already written regarding weddin...
Read more..

Car Bodywork Paint Repair Restoration Techniques - Spray Painting

By Mario Goldstein | 5 Rating | Published 2009-07-22 21:11:32

When buying a car one of the biggest cho...
Read more..

How Do I Make My Home Insurance Company Hurry Up?

By Anthony Peck | 5 Rating | Published 2009-08-07 05:45:36

Is there anything more frustrating that ...
Read more..

Do You Really Need Car Insurance

By Warren Fets | 5 Rating | Published 2009-08-21 03:45:27

There are many advantages to having car ...
Read more..

So What Do You Really Know About Fashion?

By Benedict Smythe | 5 Rating | Published 2009-08-24 15:48:39

Fashion is extremely seductive, slightly...
Read more..

Singing Lessons: Are You Creating Enough Space on Your High Notes? By Tony Joett

  in Entertainment | Published 2013-06-12 22:38:51 | 375 Reads | Unrated

Summary

A typical singing mistake is to sing a high note with a half open mouth It won’t get you there

Full Content

A typical singing mistake is to sing a high note with a half open mouth. It won’t get you there. All you’re going to achieve is a note that sounds not-quite-there yet, if you’re lucky. Worst case scenario, you’ll sound just plain awful and nasal. I always tell my students, the higher the note the wider the space. And it’s all in the vowels. Whatever word you sing that includes an A (AAAA) or E (EEEEH) sounding vowel, allows for spreading the mouth to articulate and to scale the note in any direction. Use these little opportunities when you sing. In this short article, I’ll show you
a very simple example to help you create space for your high notes.



Let’s take a song like “I Shot the Sherriff” by Bob Marley. As the famous line goes…”I shot the Sherriff, but I didn’t shoot the deputy”, your highest octave is at the very beginning of that note with the word “I”. Your mouth therefore, would need to be open at its widest (but without locking the jaw) on the word “I” (AAAAAI).



If you go through any song, try to look at the highs and lows to ascertain how much space you may need to project and scale the note correctly, taking into account the above example. Another helpful pointer I’d like to give you here is: get to know your own anatomy! Get to know how much space between the teeth produces what sound, for example. It really helps to get to know your acoustic factory a bit more. So experiment with a few ideas and see what discoveries you make. You’ll be glad you did. I’ll give you a couple of examples.



Open your mouth to take a deep breath and when your mouth is at its widest, immediately hit an extended long note with AAAAAAA; and then begin to slide your mouth shut very gradually. Listen to yourself very carefully. You’ll notice that as you continue to close down the gap your tone and pitch begin to change. Try the same exercise again in the next key up and keep moving up key by key. All the while, continue to listen to your voice. Get to know your voice. Get to discover your voice. The more you do this, the more knowledgeable you become about what sounds your voice, in synch with your mouth, can produce. In a separate article, I will show you how to capitalize on your acoustic factory.



Creating space gives you more leverage. So instead of your tone going nasal for lack of space—yes, that’s one of the reasons that bring about the nasal tone—you’ll scale the high notes with greater ease and with good placement. So whenever you’re sensing difficulty in hitting the high notes, take a look in the mirror as you sing to make sure that the space between the teeth is wide enough to hit that note. Don’t leave this to chance. Calculate everything you do to ensure you’re applying this very important technique.

Joett is a singer-songwriter, vocal coach and member of the American Society Of Composers, Authors & Publishers (ASCAP). His vocal training CD Learn to Sing with Joett is available for purchase from US-based online superstore TripleClicks. He also publishes helpful articles and tips for singers on his blog at: www.joettmusic.com

Joett is a singer-songwriter, vocal coach and member of the American Society Of Composers, Authors & Publishers (ASCAP). His vocal training CD Learn to Sing with Joett is available for purchase from US-based online superstore TripleClicks via his blog where he also publishes helpful articles and tips for singers. Visit: http://www.joettmusic.com

Comments

Login to comment

About the Author

Joett is a vocal coach, singer & songwriter whose music (available for download on iTunes and Amazon MP3) can be heard on Internet radio Jango. He teaches voice five times a week and has a growing list of students from around the world. In 2011 he is set to release a voice training CD Learn to Sing with Joett; and his debut album Vintage In Color. For regular updates, please visit his blog at: www.joettmusic.com